mcfear.

kateoplis:

When bigger was better, the suitcase-size boom box was a necessity for big-city teenagers. In the 1980s, sales nationwide topped $20 million a year. In Spike Lee’s “Do the Right Thing,” Radio Raheem carried his everywhere, playing Public Enemy’s “Fight the Power.” By the ’90s, the battery-powered bass-heavy boxes equipped with radios and cassette players were supplanted by Walkmans and smaller devices, even as hip-hop and rap — born in New York City — came to dominate musical culture worldwide.
A History of New York in 50 Objects | NYT

kateoplis:

When bigger was better, the suitcase-size boom box was a necessity for big-city teenagers. In the 1980s, sales nationwide topped $20 million a year. In Spike Lee’s “Do the Right Thing,” Radio Raheem carried his everywhere, playing Public Enemy’s “Fight the Power.” By the ’90s, the battery-powered bass-heavy boxes equipped with radios and cassette players were supplanted by Walkmans and smaller devices, even as hip-hop and rap — born in New York City — came to dominate musical culture worldwide.

A History of New York in 50 Objects | NYT

discoverynews:

Beautiful…
timelightbox:

Dan Winters grew up during the golden age of space reporting and is one few who have mastered the craft of photographing space launches. The magnificent images in his new book, Last Launch, prove that he is a virtuoso at his work.
See more photos here.

discoverynews:

Beautiful…

timelightbox:

Dan Winters grew up during the golden age of space reporting and is one few who have mastered the craft of photographing space launches. The magnificent images in his new book, Last Launch, prove that he is a virtuoso at his work.

See more photos here.

theoddmentemporium:

Walking-Stick Self-Defence in Edwardian London

The fashion in walking-sticks is to have a silver-mounted Malacca cane; everyone uses one. Everyone knows that in choosing a Malacca, it will not only serve the purpose of something to carry in one’s hand, but that this beautiful cane, the most up-to-date of all sticks, can render great service as a means of self-defence, for it can become a formidable weapon in the hands of those who have learnt how to use it.

Stick exercise falls essentially under the head of gymnastics, but if it develops muscular strength it must also be borne in mind that it renders limbs supple and gives everyone agility, elegance and grace in their movement. Moreover, referring to my long experience as a professor of physical exercise specially adapted to self-defence, I can confidently assert that the cane is the most perfect weapon of defence, as with it no one can be handicapped by size, weight, or strength, it equalises the chances of two people each armed with sticks.

There are various ways of using the stick:

1st — Holding the stick by the grip of the whole hand, the blow is delivered with a swinging hit.

2nd — The left hand can be used just as well as the right by alternately passing the stick from one hand to the other.

3rd — The stick may also be held at the ferrule end.

4th — The stick may also be held in both hands.

The blows are delivered at the head, face, body, on the hands, and at the legs. To deliver a point, the stick is made to glide through the hands. The end of the stick can also be used as a dagger.

From: ”The Walking-Stick as a Means of Self-Defence,” by Pierre Vigny, Health and Strength, July 1903, pages 253-254.

astroengine:

Possibly my favorite astronomical view… taken with the Discovery Channel Telescope at Lowell Observatory.

The Discovery Channel Telescope at Lowell Observatory, near Flagstaff, Ariz., is complete and has begun observing the cosmos with its 16-million-pixel camera. This camera is a close relative to the NSF-funded 36-million-pixel Large Monolithic Imager (LMI) that is now undergoing advanced testing and will soon be the primary imager for the DCT.

See all the epic First Light images!

astroengine:

Possibly my favorite astronomical view… taken with the Discovery Channel Telescope at Lowell Observatory.

The Discovery Channel Telescope at Lowell Observatory, near Flagstaff, Ariz., is complete and has begun observing the cosmos with its 16-million-pixel camera. This camera is a close relative to the NSF-funded 36-million-pixel Large Monolithic Imager (LMI) that is now undergoing advanced testing and will soon be the primary imager for the DCT.

See all the epic First Light images!